Variations on
the Double-Breasted
jacket

Hugo JACOMET

Variations on the theme of the Double-Breasted jacket

Gentlemen,

As you know, our columns heartedly defend the now undisputable return of the double breasted suit and jacket.

We have had the opportunity to write several articles on the subject and are constantly on the lookout for new interpretations for this staple of classic masculine elegance, as it is undergoing a full blown revival.

The gorgeous double breasted jacket we are featuring today (see above) , on top of its unusual fabric and colour (a very thick mustard Harris Tweed with a light-and-dark brown sheen), beautifully and successfully breaks some of the fundamental rules of the double breasted jacket.

– First of all, the classic rule of the double breasted suit says that it must ALWAYS have peak lapels. An increasing number of tailors or stylists (inspired by Tom Ford and the likes) have adopted peak lapels on single breasted jackets. Inversely, notch lapels on a double breasted suit are extremely rare. It is seen on this beautiful 4 on 2 piece (2 active buttons out of 4), by the young bespoke label 19-eighty-2 in Liverpool, in England.

– Then, the fabric is essentially a “sports” fabric, while double breasted jackets are rather, by nature, worn on formal or business occasions.

– Lastly, it is quite rare to see patch pockets (including on the breast pocket) on double breasted jackets, as well as a welted vertical pocket on above the right patch pocket, reminiscent of the hand warmer pockets on travel jackets.

The young Liverpool bespoke house, which we didn’t know before, really seems worthy of our interest. If you wish to know more about them, we recommend you visit our friend Jon Holt’s website: The Bespoke Gentleman. It features among other things a very interesting interview with the founder of this new label.

The only damper on the first photo is the rather unfortunate collar gap (there is a small gap between both and the shirt collar, which is not very well suited for the ensemble – or really any ensemble for that matter), but the final result is very interesting and worth praising !

Cheers, HUGO